THE FUTURE OF ZOOS

A Special Symposium co-hosted by
The Canisius College Institute for the Study of Human-Animal Relations
and

The Buffalo Zoological Gardens

February 10-11, 2012

 

Symposium Welcome 

 

Institute Director, Michael Noonan, introduces symposium sponsor, Al Gress.

Introductory Remarks 

Michael Noonan frames the symposium topic and goals. 

  Anticipating the Nature of the Future Zoo Visitor

Donna Fernandes speaks about the demographics of future zoo visitors.

The Expectations of Future Zoo Visitors

Jesse Donahue presents on the future expectations of zoo visitors.

Panel Discussion

Expert panel discusses implications of previous papers.

Beyond the Animal: Exhibiting and Interpreting Nature

David Hancocks frames the challenge for future zoo exhibitry.

Panel Discussion

Expert panel discusses implications of previous papers.

The Size and Shape of Future Zoos

Jeff Bonner predicts the forms that future zoos might take.

Panel Discussion

Expert panel discusses implications of previous papers.

Reductionism and Blurred Categories

Kenneth Shapiro speaks about the merging of zoos and wildlife parks in the future.

Design and Architecture

Jon Coe presents on third generation conservation, post-immersion and beyond future zoo design and architecture.

Panel Discussion

Expert panel discusses implications of previous papers.

An Anthrozoological Perspective

Paul Waldau argues that zoos have the potential to imprison us, whereas zoos can/should liberate us.

Panel Discussion

Expert panel discusses implications of previous papers.

The Role of Zoos in Conservation

Kevin Murphy speaks about the future zoo's role in conservation.

Managed Exchanges of Specimens with Wild Populations

Monika Fiby argues for a new formula in which the categories of captive, semi-wild, and wild become blurred.

The Diminished State of Wildlife: How Zoos Might Respond

William Conway speaks about how zoos might respond to the diminished state of wildlife in the future.

Panel Discussion

Expert panel discusses implications of previous papers.

The Perspective of Animal Welfare in Shaping Zoos in the Future

Ron Kagan presents on how animal welfare will shape future zoos.

Panel Discussion

Expert panel discusses implications of previous papers.

 

Day 2

 

Day 2 Introduction

Michael Noonan introduces the second day of the symposium.

The Unique Education Mission of Zoos

Keith Winsten presents on the role of education in future zoos.

Zoos as Resources for Scientific Research

Donald Moore describes the central role that scientific investigations will play in future zoos.

Panel Discussion

Expert panel discusses implications of previous papers.

The Expanding Mission of Zoos: New Socio-Cultural Roles

Erik Trump predicts that future zoos will morp into many and diverse forms. 

Panel Discussion

Expert panel discusses implications of previous papers.

The Future Regulatory Environment

James Gesualdi brings a lawyer's perspective to the future regulatory environment of zoos.

Species Selection in Future Zoos

Catherine Doyle argues that select species do not belong in zoos.

Standard-based Decision Making

Susan Margulis argues that species-specific standards should determine species selection in future zoos.

The Possibility of Resurrecting Extinct Species

Jeffrey Yule outlines what a future cloning program for resurrecting extinct species.

Bioengineered Life: Moral Implications for Future Zoos

John Fraser predicts the advances in technology will dramatically expand options for future zoos.

The Role of Robotics in Future Zoos

Michael Noonan predicts that robots that realistically simulate animals will be included in future zoos.

Panel Discussion

Expert panel discusses implications of previous papers.

Closing Comments

Michael Noonan summarizes the two day conference.

 

 

Contact Info: Michael Noonan, PhD, Canisius College , 2001 Main St., Buffalo, NY 14208                                                                                     noonan@canisius.edu